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lily

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Etymology

  • Old English lilie, from Latin lilia, plural of lilium "a lily," cognate with Greek leirion, both perhaps borrowed from a corrupted pronunciation of an Egyptian word. Used in Old Testament to translate Hebrew shoshanna and in New Testament to translate Greek krinon. As an adjective, 1530s, "white, pure, lovely;" later "pale, colorless" (1580s). Also from the Latin word are German lilie, French lis, Spanish lirio, Italian giglio. The lily of the valley translates Latin lilium convallium (Vulgate), a literal rendition of the Hebrew term in Song of Solomon ii:1. It apparently was applied to a particular plant (Convallaria majalis) first by 16c. German herbalists. Lily pad is from 1834, American English.1530, 1580, 1834

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Articles from Wikipedia

  • Lily (name) Lily is a feminine given name directly derived from lily, the flower. The popularity of the name increased steadily in most English-speaking countries during the late 20th century. In the United States, "Lily" became one of the top-100 names for newborn girls in 2002 and reached a rank of 18 by 2009. Lily was the 3rd most popular name for baby girls in England in 2011. In Northern Ireland, "Lily" increased in rank by 90 places in 2003, reaching the top 100.
  • Lily James Lily Chloe Ninette Thomson, known professionally as Lily James, is an English actress. She studied acting at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London and began her acting career in the British television series Just William (2010). Following her role in the period drama series Downton Abbey (2012–2015), her film breakthrough was the title role in Cinderella (2015).
  • Lily (disambiguation) Lily, Lilium, is a genus of flowering plants with large flowers.
  • Lily the Pink (song) "Lily the Pink" is a 1968 song released by the UK comedy group The Scaffold, which reached No. 1 in the UK Singles Chart. It is a modernisation of an older folk song titled "The Ballad of Lydia Pinkham". The lyrics celebrate the "medicinal compound" invented by Lily the Pink, and humorously chronicle the "efficacious" cures it has brought about, such as inducing morbid obesity to cure a weak appetite, or bringing about a sex change as a remedy for freckles.
  • Pictures of Lily "Pictures of Lily" is a single by the British rock band the Who, written by guitarist and primary songwriter Pete Townshend. It was released in 1967 as a single, and made the top five in the UK, but failed to break into the top 50 in the United States. In 1971, "Pictures of Lily" was included in the Who album Meaty Beaty Big and Bouncy, a compilation of previously released singles.
  • Lily Was Here "Lily Was Here" is an instrumental duet by English musician David A. Stewart and Dutch saxophonist Candy Dulfer. It was released as a single in November 1989 from the soundtrack of the same name for the Dutch movie De Kassière, also known by the English title Lily Was Here. The song reached number one in the Netherlands and became a top-twenty hit in several other European countries, Australia, and the United States.
  • Lily Was Here (film) Lily Was Here is a 1989 Dutch drama film directed by Ben Verbong. One song from the soundtrack, performed by Candy Dulfer and Dave Stewart, was later released as a single – "Lily Was Here".
  • Lily of the West "Lily of the West" is a traditional British and Irish folk song, best known today as an American folk song, listed as number 957 in the Roud Folk Song Index. The American version is about a man who travels to Louisville and falls in love with a woman named Mary, Flora or Molly, the eponymous Lily of the West. He catches Mary being unfaithful to him, and, in a fit of rage, stabs the man she is with, and is subsequently imprisoned. In spite of this, he finds himself still in love with her. In the original version, the Lily testifies in his defense and he is freed, though they do not resume their relationship.
  • The Lily of the Valley "The Lily of the Valley" is a Christian hymn written by William Charles Fry (1837–1882) in London for the Salvation Army. Ira D. Sankey arranged the words to the music of "The Little Old Log Cabin In The Lane" composed by Will Hays.
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